Photo courtesy of ElCapitan

You like food, right?

Of course you do (and if you don’t, your taste buds will certainly have something to say on the matter).

Food gives us the nutrients and energy we need. But, we need those elements in a balanced manner to make sure that we get the right amount of everything.

So, why am I talking about food in a blog post about marketing tips (aside from the fact that I’m writing this right before lunch and I’m so hungry I might just take a bite out of my laptop).

It’s because we can use food (or, more specifically, food groups) to help us understand the components that make up an important part of content marketing: the blog.

LinkedIn created an infographic off of a HubSpot post about how to make sure your blog avoids being boring, and they used different food groups to illustrate how to do that. As with anything else in life, variety is the key to a successful blog.

While it’s time consuming and requires a real strategy, blogging is the base of all content marketing. Here are the basic groups of content types that readers enjoy and how much of each you should have on your blog (slightly altered from its original form).

Whole Wheat & Grains

Photo courtesy of praline3001 on Flickr

Photo courtesy of praline3001 on Flickr

Much like their real food counterparts, these types of posts will fill readers up with hearty content that can be dished out fairly quickly.

Spend about 35% of your time and effort on these posts.

Examples include:

  • How-to posts
  • Sharing posts from influential third parties
  • Repurposing old content

RhinoForce example:

Photo courtesy of Rick Ligthelm

Photo courtesy of Rick Ligthelm

Vegetables

Pieces that require a bit more effort than the stuff you churn out regularly. These have more substance than a standard post.

Spend about 25% of your time and effort on these posts.

Examples include:

  • Thought leadership pieces
  • Guest Topics
  • Case Studies
  • Event Coverage

RhinoForce example:

Meat

Photo courtesy of Julia Frost on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Julia Frost on Flickr

Pieces that, while time-consuming to create, give high value to readers and make them want to return to your blog.

Spend about 20% of your time and effort on these posts.

Examples include:

  • Strategic research and analysis
  • Large and unique thought leadership pieces

RhinoForce example:

Photo courtesy of Kirti Poddar on Flickr

Photo courtesy of Kirti Poddar on Flickr

Sweets

Little lighthearted treats that can be easily shared.

Spend about 15% of your time and effort on these posts.

Examples include:

  • Cultural content
  • Amusing videos, graphics and stories

RhinoForce example:

Condimentscondiments - green kozi

Little tidbits that add flavor to content, whether subtle or striking.

Spend about 5% of your time and effort on these posts.

Examples include:

  • Bold statements that express a strong point of view
  • Helpful links

RhinoForce example:

For a blog that updates daily (I dunno who has that kind of time, but apparently some people do), a balanced weekly schedule would be something like:

  • Monday – Vegetables
  • Tuesday – Meat
  • Wednesday – Whole Wheat and Grains
  • Thursday – Condiments
  • Friday – Sweets
  • Saturday – More Whole Wheat and Grains
  • Sunday – Fasting

The advantage of updating daily is that 82% of bloggers who update daily see an increased ROI, while only 57%  of bloggers who update monthly see an increased ROI.

So, while it takes a lot of effort and time, a well-balanced blog will pay off in the long run. People love balance and variety, so give ’em what they want.

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About Rob Swystun

A former journalist, Rob has been writing professionally since 2006 and now focuses on copy writing, website content, articles, blogging, ghost writing, editing, proofreading and public relations. Currently an Athabasca University student studying for a BA in Communications, Rob holds a Journalism Diploma from Langara College in Vancouver.

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